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Low Sugar Drinks Still Produce Tooth Decay


Recent research has just been released indicating that low sugar drinks still produce tooth decay through the acidity of the drink.

LOW SUGAR DRINKS STILL PRODUCE TOOTH DECAY

Recent research has just been released indicating that low sugar drinks still produce tooth decay through the acidity of the drink. Therefore low sugar drinks should not be taken instead of the equivalent high sugar drinks because they will produce the same amount of tooth decay. The Australian Dental Association recommends that a dietary intake limiting any sweet drink in preference to water is much healthier. Whether or not a soft drink has ‘low sugar’ it still has the same amount of acidity, and therefore still increases the risk of dental caries. Australians should limit their consumption of soft drinks, whether or not they are high or ‘low’ in sugar.

Australians should be careful to limit their consumption of cordials, fruit drinks, vitamin waters, energy and sports drinks and soft drinks (both full flavour and low sugar varieties). Children and teens should be encouraged to drink water (preferably fluoridated tap water) as much as possible. Further details about this article can be found on the Australian Dental Association website Media Release 20 February 2013 (pdf format).